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CATS - BASIC SAFETY

Plants that are deemed safe for Cats

Plants, medicine, foods and chemical that are known to be harmful to cats

Siamese Kittens assumes no liability for the content of this page.
This advice is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a vet
or animal care specialist, and is only intended as a guide.

Please contact your local veterinary practice for advice or treatment immediately
if you are worried about your pet’s health - even if they are closed,
they will always have an out of hours service available.
You may also want to contact the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-213-6680.

 

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CATS and PLANTS plus
DANGEROUS HOUSEHOLD ITEMS

Siamese Kittens website assumes no liability for the content of this page.
This information is not intended to replace the expertise of animal care specialists,
and is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a vet and is only intended as a guide.
Please contact your local veterinary practice for advice or treatment immediately
If you are worried about your pet’s health - even if they are closed,
they will always have an out of hours service available.
Find out more about what to do in an out of hours emergency.

If you think your pet has been poisoned contact your veterinarian immediately or call the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-213-6680.

Safe for Cats

Plants Safe For Cats

  • Astilbe (Astilbe sp.)
  • Bee Balm (Monarda sp.)
  • Begonia (Begonia sp.),
  • Bugbane (Cimifuga racemosa)
  • Butterfly flower (Schianthus sp.)
  • Calendula (Callendula sp.)  
  • Catmint/catnip (Nepeta sp.)
  • Coleus (Coleus sp.)
  • Columbine (Aquilegia sp.)
  • Coneflowers (Echinacea purpura)
  • Coral Bells (Heuchera sp.)
  • Cosmos (Cosmos sp.)
  • Goat’s Beard (Aruncus dioicus)
  • Impatiens (Impatiens sp.)
  • Nasturtium (Tropaeolum sp.)
  • New Guinea Impatiens
  • Petunia (Petunia sp.)
  • Phlox (Phlox sp.)
  • Primrose (Primula sp.)
  • Queen of the Meadow (Filipendula ulmaria)
  • Roses (Rose sp.)
  • Snapdragons (Antirrhinum sp.)
  • Spider flower (Cleome sp.)
  • Turf Lilly (Liriope sp.)
  • Violet (Viola sp.)
  • Yellow Corydalis (Corydalis xutea)
  • Zinnia (Zinnia sp.)

 

Harmful to Cats

Poisonous Plants For Cats

  • Amaryllis (Amaryllis sp.)
  • Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
  • Azaleas and Rhododendfons (Rhododendron sp.)
  • Castor bean (Ricinus communis) — oral irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, kidney failure, convulsions, death.
  • Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.)
  • Clematis
  • Coleus
  • Cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.)
  • Daffodils
  • Geranium
  • Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea), – vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, cardiac failure, death.
  • Hibiscus
  • Hyacinths
  • Ivies
  • Japanese Yew (Taxus cuspidata) — tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, seizures, death.
  • Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum) — vomiting, seizures, depression, trouble breathing.
  • Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe sp.)
  • Lily (Lilium species) — kidney failure in cats — ALL parts of the plant, even in small amounts.
  • Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis) — vomiting, heart trouble, disorientation, coma, seizures.
  • Nightshade (Atropa belladonna) — drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, slow heart, weakness.
  • Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
  • Morning Glory (Ipomea sp.) – vomiting, diarrhea, agitation, tremors, disorientation, ataxia, anorexia.
  • Oleander (Nerium oleander) – diarrhea, trouble breathing, tremors, collapse, incoordination.
  • Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum sp.)
  • Peony
  • Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Precatory Beans (Arbus precatorius) – severe vomiting and diarrhea, tremors, fever, shock, death.
  • Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)
  • Spanish thyme (Coleus ampoinicus)
  • Sweet William
  • Tulip and Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa and Narcissus sp.)
  • Vinca
  • Yew (Taxus sp.)

 

 

Chemicals Poisonous to Cats

To prevent accidental pet poisoning, keep these and all chemicals locked away:

  • Antifreeze
  • Bleach
  • Brake fluid
  • Cleaning sprays and foams including anything containing Lysol.
    Use instead products such as 7th Generation.
  • Detergents
  • De-icing salts (which pets may walk through, then lick from their pads)
  • Dog flea and tick medication (pills, collars, sprays, shampoos)
  • Fertilizers 
  • Mulch, including cocoa mulch. Use a mulch of hardwood or pine instead.
  • Herbicides, including snail bait and Round-up
  • Insect and rodent bait.
 

Human Foods poisonous to your feline:

  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine (coffee, soda, tea)
  • Chives
  • Chocolate
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Onions
  • Raisins
  • Xylitol (found in sugarless gums, candies, toothpastes)
  • Yeast dough
 

Human Medications Poisonous to Cats

Few human medications may be used for cats. 
Always consult your vet before administering any medications. 
Note that some medications that can work for dogs, can be deadly to cats.

  • Antidepressant medicines (especially Effexor which attracts cats)
  • Cancer Medications
  • Cold medicines
  • Diet pills
  • Pain medications including:
    • acetaminophen
    • aspirin
    • ibuprofen
    • Tylenol
    • Aleve
    • Motrin
    • Naproxen
  • Most Vitamins and other supplements

First Actions to Take if You Think Your Cat has been Exposed.

Remember, EVERY  moment counts if you think your cat has been exposed to something toxic. Keep your veterinarian's phone number in an obvious place, along with the number for the Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435. They can give you immediate advice

1. Remove any toxic material from the hair and skin.

2. If it necessary, you can wash the cat with warm water and a little organic pet shampoo.

3.      Watch for these symptoms of poisoning

  • Anxiety
  • Agression
  • Breathing problems
  • Depression
  • Confusion
  • Coughing
  • Crying
  • Diarrhea
  • Foaming at mouth
  • Lethargy 
  • Drooling

4. The identity of the plant, chemical or food is very important for determining treatment. If you don’t know what kind of substance it is,  bring it with you for possible identification.  Also bring any vomit or feces. 

5. Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-213-6680.

6. VETERINARY Diagnosis and Treatment

The best diagnosis is made by knowing what has poisoned your pet. Your veterinarian will examine your cat and possibly order tests. The vet may try to induce vomiting and may give your cat activated charcoal to absorb any toxic material in the stomach or gut  They may give medication such as sucrafate to protect the any areas of the stomach that maybe damaged.  The veterinarian may also administer intravenous fluids or anti-inflammatory medication, especially if the gastrointestinal tract is severely affected.

HOME HISTORY FAQ REFERENCES
& LETTERS

GALLERY

FAMOUS PEOPLE
AND THEIR SIAMESE
IMPORTANT
LINKS
NEWS CONTACT

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Diane Kramer * San Diego * CA
858-484-8575 * email: WeLoveSiamese@aol.com

If the email link fails, copy and paste WeLoveSiamese@aol.com into your email "TO" field

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

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